North Park

Ayotzinapa: Cronica de un Crimen de Estado

sdindymedia

A full house crowded into the Digital Gym Cinema on August 26 for the San Diego premiere of the film Ayotzinapa: Crónica de un Crimen de Estado.

The documentary "reveals how the forced disappearance of 43 students and the murder of three others in Ayotzinapa was an organized crime of the state, and not an isolated incident."

The night of September 26, 2014, in the city of Iguala, Guerrero, in Mexico, more the 100 young students of the Escuela Normal Rural of Ayotzinapa, that had left the school to make a public collection to fund their trip to Mexico City, were attacked by police forces, resulting in 3 students dying, more then 20 injuries, and 43 kidnapped by the police, with the involvement of the Mexican military.

Two student survivors of the massacre of Iguala reconstructed the climate of impunity, corruption, and criminality that exists, not only in the state of Guerrero but in the entire country. Through an interweaving story, those interviewed tell the story of the actual decomposition of Mexico, beginning with the crime in Iguala, denouncing that this is not an isolated action, but an event with preceding criminal stories that are part of the political narco-state of Mexico.

Within a few days of the state having perpetrated the crime, tens of thousands of voices, especially young voices, echoed through streets and avenues of cities of Mexico and the world, demanding the appearance of 43 student with life, who were victims of the enforced disappearance, and denouncing this act as a crime of State, which to this day still has gone unpunished.

Proceeds from the screening benefit the families of the disappeared students.

Photos || Event Announcement || Solidaridad con Ayotzinapa: Video ||Caravana 43 || Film Trailer





Queer Liberation Started in San Francisco, Not at Stonewall

Mark Gabrish Conlan

“By day I was a reporter for KGO-TV” — the San Francisco affiliate of ABC — “and by night I was a writer for the Berkeley Barb,” the Bay Area’s pioneering “underground” paper. Laurence also led a double life of another sort — as a closeted Gay man in an era when almost nobody was “out” in the modern sense — until March 1969, when the firing of a friend with whom he’d appeared in a provocative Barb photo led him to found the Committee on Homosexual Freedom (CHF) and lead the first protests in U.S. history against a private employer for firing a Queer employee...

What they did was mount a picket outside the States Steamship headquarters from noon to 2 p.m., Monday through Friday. Laurence recalled that his group started with 13 “core” members and ultimately grew to about 25, plus other people on a contact list they could bring out for the States pickets and other demonstrations. Brown recalled that he was made picket captain “because I already had experience leading demonstrations with the anti-Viet Nam War movement.” He sought out training from the American Friends’ Service Committee (AFSC) on how to do nonviolent protesting, but that group — which, Brown recalled, had “organized in the South and risked their lives for Black civil rights” — refused to help a Queer group mount a protest. So Brown bought a dozen copies of the AFSC’s instruction manual on nonviolent civil disobedience and the group’s members taught themselves.

CHF founders realized they needed allies — and they looked for them in the same places modern Queer activists often do: the militant organizations of people of color. In 1969 that meant the Black Panther Party and the United Farm Workers (UFW). Laurence and Brown recalled how CHF joined the UFW’s pickets outside Safeway supermarkets to get people to stop buying grapes. In addition to signs with the UFW’s slogans, they also carried signs reading “Gay Is Good” and other messages from the new Queer movement. Not everyone on the UFW picket lines liked the idea of marching with a group carrying “Gay Is Good” messages. So, Laurence said, they went right to the top. “We called [UFW president] César Chávez, and he said, ‘Let them picket.’”

Later Laurence got a call from the Black Panthers, who essentially wanted him as a human shield to forestall a police raid on their headquarters they’d been tipped was about to happen. “They wanted some white people there,” he recalled. “I went down and it was obvious that I was Gay. The Panthers were impressed, and they taught us. --Read More from Mark Gabrish Conlan--

See also: Gay Liberation DIDN’T Begin at Stonewall!!!





Corazon del Indymedia

sdindymedia

SD Indymedia converged on the Media Arts Center SD in North Park Friday, Jan. 27 as part of one of the final events of Enero Zapatista. The Indymedia Collective introduced the audience to the SD IMC 2011 webpage model, the ten year history of Indymedia in San Diego and spoke about building relationships with compañer@s in Chiapas, Mexico.

Corazón del Tiempo was screened on the theater in development, Media Arts space. The film depicted a couple in struggle, not only with the revolution being fought by the rebel Zapatistas against the Mexican government and para-militaries, but their love and progressive ideas were at odds with the traditional Mayan customs of their village.

Friends from Schools for Chiapas, who organize trips to the Lacondon Jungle to visit Zapatistas, were on hand to speak briefly about the scenes and characters depicted in the film. As the film was shot on location Zapatista territory and the actors are untrained Zapatista actors.

Guests from Ocupemos el Barrio and Occupy San Diego updated us on their current campaign and related the Zapatista struggle to their own.

The event was a media equipment drive to benefit independent media projects in Chiapas, Mexico. An anonymous donor left a laptop. SD Indymedia will continue collecting laptops, digital and video cameras, audio recorders, and other equipment that is hard to come by in Southern Mexico. To donate equipment contact SD Indymedia. --Read More (with Photos)--

SDIMC E-mail: imc-sd@lists.indymedia.org || Chiapas Indymedia [in revision] || Ocupemos el Barrio || Schools for Chiapas || Event Announcement





Enero Zapatista 2012

Enero Zaptista is a month-long series of events celebrating the resistance of the Zaptistas of Chiapas, Mexico, talking about Zapatismo and raising awareness about how this philosophy connects to our local struggles. These events are put together by local collectives, organizations and individuals who are working from below and to the left. We are working to create a world where many worlds fit.






Occupy North Park- Action at the BofA! 1pm Tuesday

10/10/2011 7:50 pm
author: 
anonymous

Tuesday, October 11 · 1:00pm - 4:00pm

the sidewalk in front of Bank of America
31st & University Ave.
San Diego, California

Who- You! and anyone who doesn't want to camp out downtown, doesn't like large crowds, can't afford a bus pass, but still wants to do their part to save America!

What- Occupy North Park- help talk BofA victims into switching to a non-profit credit union. "Free Card Cutting Service" Stickers for the kids!

Why- To Defeat the Evil Power!

Where- the public sidewalk in front of the Bank of America at 31st and University Ave. in North Park.

Event Location: 
31st and University Ave.

Activists Host "Radio Summer" Event August 29

author: 
Mark Gabrish Conlan/Zenger's Newsmagazine

Members of San Diego's activist community gathered together at the Media Arts Center in North Park on August 29 to hear about how low-power FM (LPFM) radio can create new opportunities for progressive media and break the Right-wing stranglehold on the local airwaves. The attendees heard a presentation via Skype from Philadelphia-based Ian Smith of the Prometheus Radio Project, which was instrumental in lobbying Congress and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for the LPFM opportunity in the first place, and also heard from representatives of the World Beat Center, Media Rights Coalition and Activist San Diego.






Teen Producers' Project Makes Pro-Immigrant Videos

author: 
Leo E. Laurence/Zenger's Newsmagazine

Teen Producers’ Project Makes Immigration Videos

Congressmember Filner Promises to Show Them in D.C.

by LEO E. LAURENCE, J.D.

Copyright © 2011 by Leo E. Laurence for Zenger’s Newsmagazine • All rights reserved

Teenagers from 14-19 in both San Diego and Tijuana produced numerous, professional-quality videos on undocumented immigration which were recently screened at Media Arts Center in North Park. It runs the enormously successful Teen Producers’ Project, on both sides of the border.






Larry Caveney’s “Garage” Is Also an Art Gallery

author: 
Mark Gabrish Conlan

Every month, artist Larry Caveney throws open the door of his garage and reveals … an art gallery displaying a carefully curated theme show. In this interview from the September 2010 Zenger's Newsmagazine, he talks about his history of exploring non-traditional art spaces and the way The Garage helps him and the other artists he shows reach an audience in a comfortable non-commercial venue.






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